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  1. | You must have as few collection buckets as you can get by with.
  2. | You must empty them regularly.
    • You have to think about your stuff more than you realize but not as much as you’re afraid you might
    • there is no single, once-and-for-all solution
    • once you’ve decided on all the actions you need to take, you must keep reminders of them organized in a system you review regularly
    • you must clarify exactly what your commitment is and decide what you have to do, if anything, to make progress toward fulfilling it.
    • disciplining yourself to make front-end decisions about all of the “inputs” you let into your life so that you will always have a plan for “next actions” that you can implement or renegotiate at any moment
    • You’ve probably made many more agreements with yourself than you realize, and every single one of them—big or little—is being tracked by a less-than-conscious part of you. These are the “incompletes,” or “open loops,” which I define as anything pulling at your attention that doesn’t belong where it is, the way it is
    • Time is the quality of nature that keeps events from happening all at once. Lately it doesn’t seem to be working.
    • Almost every project could be done better, and an infinite quantity of information is now available that could make that happen
    • Imagine throwing a pebble into a still pond. How does the water respond? The answer is, totally appropriately to the force and mass of the input; then it returns to calm. It doesn’t overreact or underreact
    • capturing all the things that need to get done—now, later, someday, big, little, or in between—into a logical and trusted system outside of your head and off your
    • most of the stress people experience comes from inappropriately managed commitments they make or accept
    • getting things done and doing them well
    • the high levels of training in the martial arts teach and demand balance and relaxation as much as anything else. Clearing the mind and being flexible are key
    • Anxiety is caused by a lack of control, organization, preparation, and action. —David Kekich
    • if it’s on your mind, your mind isn’t clear. Anything you consider unfinished in any way must be captured in a trusted system outside your mind, or what I call a collection bucket, that you know you’ll come back to regularly and sort through.
    • No software, seminar, cool personal planner, or personal mission statement will simplify your workday or make your choices for you as you move through your day, week, and life